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Cancer of the Vulva

 

 

 Cancer of the vulva is usually treated with surgery. (Read on-line review articles here, here and here.) For a definition of the stages go here.

There has been increasing use of radiation in recent years. As noted below radiation can be used to treat lymph nodes (either inguinal or deep pelvic nodes.) There is also increasing use of radiation plus chemotherapy for advanced cases either as preoperative treatment (to shrink the tumor and allow more limited surgery) or as the only treatment for patients with inoperable cancer.

For a discussion of radiation go here. For the best general information on vulvar cancer go to the links below:

American Cancer Society
AMA Site
Cancer Net
Medline Vulva Sites
NCI Patient Site
NCI Physician Site

Survival by Stage
More survival data
More survival data
More on pathology and prognosis

 

 

Assessment of current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging of vulvar carcinoma relative to prognostic factors for survival (a Gynecologic Oncology Group study).

Homesley HD  Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1991 Apr;164(4):997-1003

Analysis of 588 patients with vulvar carcinoma delineated four risk groups by the proportional hazards model. Groin node status (laterality and number positive) and lesion diameter were the only two important independent prognostic factors. The 5-year relative survival rates were 98%, 87%, 75%, and 29% for the risk group categories of minimal (negative groin nodes and lesion diameter less than or equal to 2 cm), low (one positive groin node and lesion diameter less than or equal to 2 cm or negative groin nodes and fewer than two lesions less than or equal to 8 cm diameter), intermediate (negative groin nodes and lesion diameter greater than 8 cm diameter, one positive groin node and lesion diameter greater than 2 cm, or two unilaterally positive groin nodes and lesion diameter less than or equal to 8 cm), and high (three or more positive groin nodes or two bilaterally positive groin nodes), respectively. Applying the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging (1988) to these data discriminated risk of death (caused by recurrent vulvar cancer); the 5-year rates were 98%, 85%, 74%, and 31% for stages I, II, III, and IV, respectively. However, within International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage III there were 47 low-, 95 intermediate-, and 28 high-risk patients with relative survivals of 95%, 74%, and 34%, respectively. Overall, this assessment validates current International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics vulvar carcinoma staging, but further refinements are warranted in stage III.